Social Technologies

An occassional blog on social media and information technologies for human interaction and communication, and other ideas by @bacigalupe

University Rankings Time: Not About Quality or Equity

University Rankings Time: Not About Quality or Equity

Gonzalo Bacigalupe

This is the time universities release news about how they rank worldwide, nationwide, statewide, and citywide. There are all sort of rankings and universities, colleges, and schools. In at least one ranking almost university or college has a place. Examples abound, in some campuses, administrators are proud of a ranking that reflects what goes on in another campus of a large university. Administrators, faculty, students, graduates, and others, share proudly the ranking that favors their institution prestige. Everyone has something to say about it, show their pride, let faculty senates know where we are or where we will be next year, or the next decade, or whenever. It puts every institution on a race to build a new shiny building, attract the top SAT students (the wealthier students), etc. while also writing mission statements that are all about equity, justice, community, etc…

number one (first)

University rankings are easily manipulable and don’t necessarily reflect academic or faculty quality. The rankings reflect the views of deans and chancellors and their reporting of money spent, but not the significance or impact of the research, or the depth of ideas.

Moreover, these rankings deepen the inequality among universities and colleges.

Be aware, when you proudly share belonging or graduated from some university highly ranked, what you are doing is to uncritically add to the buzz of a carefully orchestrated marketing strategy. Highlighting an institution success in ranking high or worrying about being low in a list hides the corporate mentality that has taken over universities and colleges.

Feel proud of what you can do with the education you got and the impact it has had in your life and that of your community. Rankings are a poor measure of quality and the dominance of the assumption that “bigger is better” that many uncritically embrace. Topic11NotesImage2

Filed under: technology

Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters

See on Scoop.itCollaborative e-Learning

People connect to form groups on Twitter for a variety of purposes. The networks they create have identifiable contours that are shaped by the topic being discussed, the information and influencers driving the conversation, and the social network structures of the participants.

bacigalupe‘s insight:

Polarized Crowds: Political conversations on Twitter

Conversations on Twitter create networks with identifiable contours as people reply to and mention one another in their tweets. These conversational structures differ, depending on the subject and the people driving the conversation. Six structures are regularly observed: divided, unified, fragmented, clustered, and inward and outward hub and spoke structures. These are created as individuals choose whom to reply to or mention in their Twitter messages and the structures tell a story about the nature of the conversation.

See on www.pewinternet.org

Filed under: technology

Newton Suicides: Is High-Achiever School Culture Breaking Our Kids?

See on Scoop.itCollaborative e-Learning

A Newton father argues that toxic high-achieving culture over-stresses kids and could contribute to suicide, and the school system must acknowledge and address that more.

See on commonhealth.wbur.org

Filed under: technology

Because Who is Perfect? Design for real people

See on Scoop.itAesthetics & Space

You’ve never seen designs quite like this profound idea. It’s guaranteed to open your mind to beauty and gratitude. Image:YouTube
See on www.realfarmacy.com

Filed under: technology

Social networking for medical information: A digital divide or a trust inquiry?

See on Scoop.itSocial Media and Healthcare Evaluation

bacigalupe‘s insight:

To profile social networkers and those who use social networks for medical purposes and investigate the role of three behavioural triggers related to control, trust and privacy.

Data sources

We use data from Europe (Eurobarometer 74.3, 2010) containing information about reported behaviour and perceptions on social issues such as media, privacy and social networking.

Study design

Probit models showing associations between individual socio-economic variables and reported social networking, and social networking for health. Extra variables proxying for control, trust in health care providers and privacy of personal information are then added. Following this, two part models accounting for zero observations are utilised.

Findings

The age profile of social networkers using it for medical care differs from that of social networkers per se. Privacy perceptions appear to be a deterrent of social networking whilst trust in the health care providers is not a significant driver of social network use.

Conclusions

There is some evidence of a digital divide owing to age, while income is not significantly associated with social networking for health. Social networking does not perfectly substitute for conventional health care.

  

See on www.sciencedirect.com

Filed under: technology

Patients’ and health professionals’ use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

See on Scoop.itSocial Media and Healthcare Evaluation

bacigalupe‘s insight:

To investigate patients’ and health professionals’ (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use.

Methods

We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals in obstetrics and gynecology. In this survey, we asked the respondents about their motives and use of social network sites (SNS: Facebook and Hyves), Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Results

Results showed that patients primarily used Twitter (59.9%), especially for increasing knowledge and exchanging advice and Facebook (52.3%), particularly for social support and exchanging advice. Professionals primarily used LinkedIn (70.7%) and Twitter (51.2%), for communication with their colleagues and marketing reasons. Patients’ main barriers for social media use were privacy concerns and unreliability of the information. Professionals’ main barriers were inefficiency and lack of skills. Both patients and professionals expected future social media use, provided that they can choose their time of social media usage.

Conclusion

The results indicate disconcordance in patients’ and professionals’ motives and use of social media in health care.

See on www.sciencedirect.com

Filed under: technology

Smartphones as Multimodal Communication Devices to Facilitate Clinical Knowledge Processes: Randomized Controlled Trial

See on Scoop.itSocial Media and Healthcare Evaluation

Smartphones as Multimodal Communication Devices to Facilitate Clinical Knowledge Processes: Randomized Controlled Trial

bacigalupe‘s insight:

Background: Despite the widespread use and advancements of mobile technology that facilitate rich communication modes, there is little evidence demonstrating the value of smartphones for effective interclinician communication and knowledge processes.
Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different synchronous smartphone-based modes of communication, such as (1) speech only, (2) speech and images, and (3) speech, images, and image annotation (guided noticing) on the recall and transfer of visually and verbally represented medical knowledge.
Methods: The experiment was conducted from November 2011 to May 2012 at the University Hospital Basel (Switzerland) with 42 medical students in a master’s program. All participants analyzed a standardized case (a patient with a subcapital fracture of the fifth metacarpal bone) based on a radiological image, photographs of the hand, and textual descriptions, and were asked to consult a remote surgical specialist via a smartphone. Participants were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions/groups. In group 1, the specialist provided verbal explanations (speech only). In group 2, the specialist provided verbal explanations and displayed the radiological image and the photographs to the participants (speech and images). In group 3, the specialist provided verbal explanations, displayed the radiological image and the photographs, and annotated the radiological image by drawing structures/angle elements (speech, images, and image annotation). To assess knowledge recall, participants were asked to write brief summaries of the case (verbally represented knowledge) after the consultation and to re-analyze the diagnostic images (visually represented knowledge). To assess knowledge transfer, participants analyzed a similar case without specialist support.
Results: Data analysis by ANOVA found that participants in groups 2 and 3 (images used) evaluated the support provided by the specialist as significantly more positive than group 1, the speech-only group (group 1: mean 4.08, SD 0.90; group 2: mean 4.73, SD 0.59; group 3: mean 4.93, SD 0.25; F2,39=6.76, P=.003; partial η2=0.26, 1–β=.90). However, significant positive effects on the recall and transfer of visually represented medical knowledge were only observed when the smartphone-based communication involved the combination of speech, images, and image annotation (group 3). There were no significant positive effects on the recall and transfer of visually represented knowledge between group 1 (speech only) and group 2 (speech and images). No significant differences were observed between the groups regarding verbally represented medical knowledge.
Conclusions: The results show (1) the value of annotation functions for digital and mobile technology for interclinician communication and medical informatics, and (2) the use of guided noticing (the integration of speech, images, and image annotation) leads to significantly improved knowledge gains for visually represented knowledge. This is particularly valuable in situations involving complex visual subject matters, typical in clinical practice.

See on www.jmir.org

Filed under: technology

Patient Opinion

See on Scoop.itSocial Media and Healthcare Evaluation

The UK’s independent non-profit feedback platform for health and social care. Share your story – help make our services better.

See on www.patientopinion.org.uk

Filed under: technology

The Diagnosis Difference | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

See on Scoop.itSocial Media and Healthcare Evaluation

A portrait of the 45% of U.S. adults living with chronic health conditions

bacigalupe‘s insight:

45% of U.S. adults report that they live with one or more chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, but also less common conditions like lupus and cancer. They are more likely than other adults to be older, to have faced a medical emergency in the past year, and, as other studies have shown, to contribute to the explosion of health care costs in the U.S.

A new national survey by the Pew Research Center, supported by the California HealthCare Foundation, explores how adults with chronic conditions gather, share, and create health information, both online and offline.

The Pew Research Center’s analysis indicates a “diagnosis difference” that is tied to several aspects of health care and technology use. For example, holding other variables constant (including age, income, education, ethnicity, and overall health status), the fact that someone has a chronic condition is independently associated with being offline.

See on pewinternet.org

Filed under: technology

It’s time to stop pretending we can separate our personal life from our work life

See on Scoop.itCollaborative e-Learning

It’s time to stop pretending we can separate our personal life from our work life

bacigalupe‘s insight:

Right now, there are two generations in the workforce who think in diametrically opposite ways about identity. Executives who came of age in the pre-smartphone era take it as a given that you should have a separate professional persona that reads like a profile in Forbes and doesn’t overlap with your personal life.

But my generation came of age in a world with social networks, and we know that we don’t have that luxury anymore. We understand that the business leaders of the future will be three-dimensional­ personalities whose lives, interests, hobbies and passions outside of work are documented and on display.

We should embrace this new world. The answer isn’t fewer baby pictures; it’s more baby pictures. It’s not that I should post less; it’s that everyone else should post more.

 

See on ideas.time.com

Filed under: technology

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